Part Two: What are NDIS Capacity Building Supports?

Updated: Nov 18, 2019

Capacity Building Supports: Learn what you can and what you can’t claim

You’ve read Part One: What Are NDIS Capacity Building Supports (if you haven’t, just click the link), and you want to gain a deeper understanding into your new plan and what you can claim within the Capacity Building Supports category.


As Plan Managers, we believe it’s important to understand the ins and outs of your NDIS plan. So, we’ve taken an in-depth look at the nine-subcategories within Capacity Building Supports. And, if you have any questions we’re happy to help.

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1. Capacity Building Supports: Support Coordination

This part of your plan’s budget is designed to help you build your skills to understand and manage your plan and implement supports so you can reach your goals.


The coordination of your supports may cover:

  • Support Connection (Level 1): short-term help to build your skills to understand your plan, connect with support services and providers, learn how to negotiate service agreements and implement your supports, then maintain relationships with (or in some cases, change) providers.

  • Support Coordination (Level 2): to build your skills to connect with supports and direct your life to ensure you’re getting the best out of your NDIS plan. This level of Support Coordination is focused on helping you build and maintain a resilient network of both paid and unpaid support in your life. Part of the ongoing support includes, monitoring of supports, resolving issues and resolution of any issues that arise.

  • Specialist Support Coordination (Level 3): is a more expert approach that is required for participants who have high complex needs or risks associated with their situation. It’s provided by a person experienced and qualified in your specific needs, such as a psychologist, occupational therapist, social worker or mental health nurse.

  • Training in Plan and Financial Management: support for self-managed participants to get training in plan admin and management, including engaging providers, developing service agreements, maintaining records, claiming payments from the NDIA and paying providers.

You will then be responsible for organising supports, maintaining records, claiming payments and paying providers. For ongoing assistance throughout your plan, a Plan Manager can help.

More specific information about this support can be found in the Support Catalogue which you can find on the NDIS Price Guides and Information page.

2. Capacity Building Supports: Improved Living Arrangements

This part of your plan is meant to help people find and/or keep appropriate accommodation. It covers:

  • Assistance with accommodation and tenancy obligations: help with rental tenancy applications and making sure the obligations under the agreement are met (such as, reasonable maintenance of house and yard).

3. Capacity Building Supports: Increased Social and Community Participation

The funding is there to help you gain the skills you need to independently access the community. Including:

  • Mentoring, peer-support and skills development: to help you set up an informal (unpaid) support or community group to give guidance around attending appointments, shopping, paying bills, taking part in social activities and maintaining relationships with others. Can also be as part of a group of two or more.

  • Support in mainstream services that promote inclusion: to build your skills and opportunities for community participation and employment. Including, specialised activities that build your skills and independence.

4. Capacity Building Supports: Finding and Keeping a Job

The purpose of these supports is to provide you with workplace assessment and counselling to build your skills and confidence to find a suitable job and engage with it to the best of your ability. They apply to people of any age (including school leavers) with an employment goal in their plan.

Support in this category includes (but isn’t limited to):

  • Therapeutic assessment and counselling: by a registered therapist to provide guidance and help you build the necessary skills to enter the workforce. For example, if you’ve experienced a traumatic injury and need support around that from mainstream employment services, you’ll get assistance to develop a new work pathway.

  • On the job support to maintain employment (usually employer initiated): to enable you to continue working to the best of your ability. The level of support is decided according to the Disability Maintenance Instrument (DMI) assessment. Level 1 – 4 is funded.

  • Individual employment support: which might include exploring what work would mean to you, building foundations for work, managing complex barriers to finding and keeping a job, specialised job customisation, supports to transition from a disability enterprise to open employment, develop a career plan, and developing other skills to help you find and keep a job. Can be provided in a group of up to three participants.

  • Specialised supported employment: as part of an Australian Disability Enterprise (ADE). This is a start-up fee paid only once when you start with an ADE. You can then be funded for support to continue employment under this ADE.

  • School leaver employment support: to help you transition from school to employment. They should be included, where reasonable and necessary, as part of your plan review in your final year of school so they can be part of your next plan.

5. Capacity Building Supports: Improved Relationships

This support category is designed for participants who have complex needs, requiring long term and/or intensive help to address concerning behaviours.


The purpose is to reduce the likelihood of behaviours developing or increasing once identified – and may include a behaviour management plan, and support strategies for family and formal supports to achieve good outcomes.

  • Behaviour intervention support: to help with significantly harmful or persistent behaviours of concern. It may include the development of behaviour support plan with temporary restrictive practices, with intention of reducing over time.

  • Training for carers and others in behaviour management: to equip them with strategies they need to support you.

  • Support to develop your daily living and life skills: to help you participate in community and social activities.

6. Capacity Building Supports: Improved Health and Wellbeing

This funding is to support you in continuing, maintaining or increasing physical mobility or wellbeing, encouraging improvement in your physical, and overall health.

You might claim the following from this category in your plan:

  • Consultation with a dietician and diet plan development: to provide advice on managing diet for health and wellbeing due to the impact of your disability. Can be provided in a group of three.

  • Support from an exercise physiologist or personal trainer: to give individual advice and training regarding the exercise you require due to the impact of your disability. May be provided in a group of three.

7. Capacity Building Supports: Improved Learning

This support is provided for those who need skills training, advice and help to move from school to further education (such as TAFE, university, etc.) This includes:

  • Support with arrangements and orientation: at the new educational/vocational facility.

8. Capacity Building Supports: Improved Life Choices

If you choose to be plan managed, this support category funds the cost of your registered Plan Manager to look after your expenses, paperwork and claims for you.

You might claim the following from this category in your plan:

  • One off setup fee and monthly processing fee: to cover provider costs to establish payment arrangements and manage your accounts ongoing.

  • Training in plan and financial management by your Plan Manager: to build your skills to manage the admin side of managing your supports. This includes, engaging providers, developing service agreements, maintaining records, claiming payments from the NDIA and paying providers.

9. Capacity Building Supports: Improved Daily Living Skills

Your funding in this category covers assessment, strategy development and/or therapy (including Early Childhood Intervention) and training by a qualified therapist or registered nurse. The purpose is to build your skills for independence and community participation.

This support might be implemented in several environments:

  • At home

  • In community/early childhood education settings

  • In a care environment

You might claim the following from this category in your plan:

  • Psychological support as part of Early Intervention: to help a child with developmental delay and/or disability and their family/carers to work towards functional independence and social participation. This may be delivered in a group of up to four children but must be by a qualified psychologist.

  • Physiotherapy support as part of Early Intervention: to help a child with developmental delay and/or disability and their family/carers to work towards functional independence and social participation. This may be delivered in a group of up to four children, but must be by a qualified physiotherapist.

  • Other therapeutic support as part of Early Intervention: to help a child with developmental delay and/or disability and their family/carers to work towards functional independence and social participation. This may be delivered in a group of up to four children.

  • Support by an allied health worker (assistant therapist): who is covered by professional indemnity insurance of a supervising therapist (or their employer). As above this is to help a child with developmental delay and/or disability and their family/carers to work towards functional independence and social participation and cannot be provided in a group setting, but under the supervision of a qualified therapist.

  • Support with decision making, daily planning and budgeting: to help you develop and maintain a personal daily budget. This includes helping with planning purchases.

  • Assessment and support of a nurse: where the care is not the usual responsibility of the health system. It includes care, training and supervision of a worker to support with complex/high care needs, and assessment, recommendation and training for continence aids.

  • Life skills and public transport training: to build your general life skills and increase your everyday independence.

  • Training for parents/carers: to help them better support you in matters relating to your disability.

  • Coordinated and integrated early childhood support and intervention: where multiple professionals come together to evaluate, plan and implement supports to improve the capacity of a child with developmental delay and/or disability and their family. To be funded for this support you need to submit a quote, and the funding is paid in an annual amount.

  • Individual and group counselling (up to group of three): to encourage self-knowledge, emotional acceptance, growth and development of personal resources to reach your goals and gain greater insight in your life.

  • Support to engage with the community: through a program that empowers you to improve your interactions/relationships with your social networks and help you to engage with the community effectively, and make informed decisions.

  • Specialised driver training: for people who have undergone a specialist Occupational Therapist Assessment and need help with driving lessons as a result of their disability.

  • Help to select or obtain a customised piece of wearable technology and prosthetics: to make a choice that will effectively assist you in your everyday life.

  • Support by an allied health worker (assistant therapist): who is covered by professional indemnity insurance of a supervising therapist (or their employer), but under the supervision of a qualified therapist and not as part of early childhood intervention. (Level 1-2)

  • Assessments, recommendations and therapy and/or training: from a qualified psychologist, physiotherapist or as part of other therapy program. Includes assistive technology. Support may be provided to a group of up to three people.

  • Exercise physiology: as an individual and group of up to 3 people to help you undertake exercise because of the impact of your disability.

To know more about the three support budgets, Core, Capital and Capacity Building read our blog on Core Supports and Part One: What Are NDIS Capacity Building Supports? And, keep an eye out for our next blog explaining Capital Supports in your NDIS Plan.

We hope this makes understanding your Capacity Building Supports clearer. If you still have questions, or would like help to understand and manage your budget you might like to engage a Plan Manager.


Read more about the benefits of working with a plan manager. Alternatively, our 100% FREE NDIS Plan Management app, can help you manage your plan.


Read more about First2Care’s plan management features.


Over to you

As you can see, the Capacity Building Supports are there to support you build your skills across a range of areas so you can live your life as independently and as fully as you can. We’d love to know if you’ve found the claiming process confusing? Let us know.


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