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For Providers: New Therapy Qualifications & Definitions

When the NDIS released their new Pricing Arrangements and Price Limits, there were a few notable changes including the release of new support item codes for therapeutic supports. The OG codes were categorised into three types: psychology, physiotherapy, and “other professional” but now there’s a whole lot more!


Get to know the new therapy supports listed and the qualifications required by the NDIA.


Smiling therapist holding a pen and notebook sitting with young man with down syndrome communicating at home
Smiling therapist holding a pen and notebook sitting with young man with down syndrome communicating at home

Expansion of therapeutic supports


While the support list for those under the age of seven receiving Early Childhood Early Intervention (ECEI) have remained the same, the list of therapeutic supports for NDIS participants over the age of seven has expanded from three types to sixteen.


Therapy supports can be incredibly important for participants with disability to help build their capacity and independence in their day-to-day life. This includes areas such as language and communication, mobility and movement, personal care, interpersonal interactions, and community living.


Although the list expansion may have been unexpected from the NDIA, it has the potential to provide better clarification of supports for participants.


New Therapy Qualifications & Definitions


Listed in the latest Pricing Arrangements and Price Limits, there are several new therapeutic supports and support items listed, with the inclusion of qualifications that are necessary to be considered a provider in that field.

  • Art Therapist – A person who is a Professional Member with the Australian, New Zealand and Asian Creative Arts Therapy Association (ANZACATA).

  • Audiologist – A person who is either currently certified as an Audiology Australia Accredited Audiologist by Audiology Australia or as a Full Member as an audiologist with the Australian College of Audiology.

  • Counsellor – A person who is either a member of the Australian Counselling Association or an accredited Registrant with the Psychotherapy and Counselling Federation of Australia.

  • Developmental Educator – A person who is a Full Member of Developmental Educators Australia Inc.

  • Dietitian – A person who is an Accredited Practising Dietitian with the Dietitians Australia.

  • Exercise Physiologist – A person who is an Accredited exercise physiologist with Exercise and Sports Science Australia.

  • Music Therapist – A person who is an Active “Registered Music Therapist” with the Australian Music Therapy Association.

  • Occupational Therapist – A person who has a current Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA) Registration as an Occupational Therapist.

  • Orthoptist – A person who has current registration with the Australian Orthoptic Board.

  • Physiotherapist – A person who has a current AHPRA Registration as a Physiotherapist.

  • Podiatrist – A person who has a current AHPRA Registration as a Podiatrist.

  • Psychologist – A person who has a current AHPRA Registration as a Psychologist.

  • Rehabilitation Counsellor – A person who is member of the Australian Society of Rehabilitation Counsellors Inc. or equivalent.

  • Social Worker – A person who is a member of the Australian Association of Social Workers.

  • Speech Pathologist – A person who is a Certified Practising Speech Pathologist (CPSP) as approved by Speech Pathology Australia.

  • Other Professional – A person who is not one of the types of professionals listed above but who the provider considers to be an appropriate professional to deliver therapeutic supports in line with the NDIS Quality and Safeguarding Commission’s requirements for the Therapeutic Supports Registration Group.

Originally when the NDIA released this Pricing Arrangements and Price Limits update, “other professional” was no longer included. This was later amended to include “other professional” with the above definition.

If your invoice is unclear about the type of therapy provided, or there is reason to believe that a provider is invoicing incorrectly regarding their qualifications, plan managers can request evidence that the practitioner holds qualifications in line with the above list. To avoid confusion, structure your invoice to clearly show the type of service delivered.


Whether you are registered or unregistered with the NDIS, it is important to consider you qualifications and ensure they are in line with and would meet the requirements of the NDIS Commission with regard to the Therapeutic Supports Registration Group.


If a support is delivered by a therapy assistant, the NDIA have also outlined that the therapy assistant must be covered by the professional indemnity insurance of the supervising therapist (or the therapist's or therapy assistant's employing provider).


Price Limits under the new Support Codes


Just like with the original support items, these new items are subject to the price limits set out in the table in the Pricing Arrangements and Price Limits (page 93 and 94). Different price limits will apply depending on the Type of Therapist delivering the support.


For therapists providing support to a group of participants, the price limit found in the table outlined in the Pricing Arrangements and Price Limits should be divided by the number of participants in the group.


Providers should make a claim for each participant using the relevant support item. Each claim should be for the total time of the support but is subject to the lower price limit.


If you have any questions, you can contact our friendly team on 1300 322 273 or support@first2care.com.au.

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